ÖKOLOG-Schulen sind Schulen zum Wohlfühlen. Sie engagieren sich für die Umwelt und suchen nachhaltige Lösungen für soziale, ökonomische und ökologische Fragestellungen.

Ökolgieschwerpunktarbeit in englischer Arbeitssprache

Jahresbericht des Schuljahres 2015/2016

Schule: Astrid Lindgren Schule für ganzheitliches Lernen 1. bis 9. Schulstufe
KoordinatorIn: Fössleitner Evelyne, MA BEd.
DirektorIn: DI, BEd Höbartner Jutta
Handlungsbereiche:
  • Einsparen von Ressourcen
  • Natur erleben im Schulumfeld
  • Schulklima und Partizipation
Inhalt
The basic concept of ecology was introduced to students at the beginning of the year. Each week, the aim was to use different experiential tools to familiarise students with simple ecological concepts, with the value of natural world and the threats upon it, the impacts that our lives have on nature and what we can do about it.

Es wurden keine Bilder hochgeladen.

Rückblick

Anzahl der Personen im ÖKOLOG-Team: 18

Welche ÖKOLOG-Aktivitäten (Maßnahmen, Projekte etc.) hat Ihre Schule im aktuellen Schuljahr im Hinblick auf die Entwicklungsziele gesetzt?
Im Schuljahr 2015/16 wurde der Ökologieunterricht in der Arbeitssprache Englisch abgehalten. Daher ist unserer diesjähriger Jahresbericht in englischer Sprache abgefasst.

Purpose and Context

The purpose of choosing Ecology and nature related themes as a specific project was three-fold:

• To introduce students to the basic concepts of ecology and to demonstrate that nature is of irreplaceable value to humans and
animals that depend on it;
• To begin to understand the impact that humans, including the students themselves, are having on nature and our natural world;
• To teach specifically in English in order for the students to increase their exposure to and skill set in the the English language in
relation to a subject with which they may not have much familiarity but one that is of critical importance to them; to listen, hear,
think, discuss, share ideas, learn and converse in English, with each other and with their teacher.

The basic concept of ecology - a study of the relationship between all living organisms and their natural environment - was introduced to students at the beginning of the year.

Each week, the aim was to use different experiential tools to familiarise students with simple ecological concepts, with the value of natural world and the threats upon it, the impacts that our lives have on nature and what we can do about it. The year was broken down into several sub-topics with repeating themes and exercises to practice English grammar, vocabulary and communication.

Sub-Topics

1. Introduction to Ecology

A word game, using cards, was played to introduce both the word “Ecology”, it’s basic meaning and also to listen to how we pronounce letters of the alphabet in the English.

Purpose:

To understand that nature is all around us, but is often subsumed by our human-made world.

Practical Exercise:

The class was held outside in a local park. Students were split into pairs. One student was blindfolded whilst the other held a pen and paper. The blindfolded students used nothing but their ears to listen to sounds around them. They read out things they heard, whilst their paired buddy wrote down what they heard on a list. Students swapped roles and then returned to the class room where all sounds were classified into human-made or natural sounds. Results of the exercise demonstrated that nature was there, but the human-made noises were more numerous and louder here in the city.

2. Water

Purpose:

To highlight the importance of water to human beings and to nature, and to introduce students to the concept of water shortages and the amount of water it takes to make a particular everyday product.

Practical Exercise:

General class discussion on why water is important to humans, food production, nature and all the plants and animals with whom we share the planet.

Students were asked to think of simple items that they use or eat on a regular basis. The list of things was put on the blackboard and students were asked to order the things from least to most water use for the production of the particular item. Items included, cup of tea, coffee, pair of shoes, t-shirt, slice of bread, glass of milk, bag of chips, hamburger, 1kg of beef, an apple etc. Students had a fun time trying to persuade each other of the correct order and arguing over which they thought had more or less water use. Students learned that meat, particularly beef production, used an enormous amount of water compared to the other things on the list. Students were then asked how they could reduce their impact on water use.

3. Forests and Endangered Species

Purpose:

To introduce students to the value of ecosystems such as the world’s forests and consequently the threats that they are facing from human activity.

Practical Exercise:

General class discussion, using maps, photographs, internet news stories about the importance of the planet’s forest ecosystems, both to human beings and our survival as well as to the plants and animals that need forests to survive. We used comparisons to the size of Austria, Vienna or Schönbrunn to describe the loss of such forests and the rate at which the planet is losing forests. Discussion introduced the concept of endangered species and the moral argument that other animals have the right to survive and flourish on our planet.

We used a crossword to practice our English and introduce terms and concepts such as habitat, nature, climate, biosphere, rainforest, pollution, logging, endangered species.

4. Waste

Purpose:

To connect the everyday production of ‘stuff’ and waste with impacts on our natural environment and to discuss ways in which we can reduce waste.

Practical Exercise:

Used the example of the Liesing River to understand what happens to a plastic bottle if we drop rubbish locally. We used our knowledge of geography to follow this waste to the Atlantic Ocean. Students also learned about how much plastics are in the oceans, and we used simulated computer models to show where our waste ends up after it enters a local waterway. Students were also shown pictures of families literally surrounded by waste, indicating how much we use in a single week.

The Handy Project:

We used the common mobile phone (handy) as an example to demonstrate the impact an everyday consumer product has on the environment. Firstly, students were asked how many mobile phones they have had in their life, and whether they thought this had much of an impact on the natural environment. An old, redundant mobile phone was then taken to pieces in the classroom, and using the components, each student was allocated a particular element which makes up the phone. We then determined which part of the world the raw materials for the element came from and through what mining or mineral extraction process. Students then used a world map to identify countries and mining sites, using pictures, to put together the puzzle of what makes up a mobile phone and where the raw materials come from. When discussing the outcome, one student wisely said “When you choose a mobile phone, you are not just buying a small phone, you are buying the world”.

5. Climate Change

Purpose: To introduce students to concepts of greenhouse gases, global warming, climate change, fossil fuel pollution and the impacts that a changing climate has on our lives.

Practical Exercise: The weeks leading up to the United Nations Climate Summit in Paris were used to highlight the importance of climate change, its basic mechanics and the impacts on humans and nature of a warming world.

An electronic thermometer was introduced into the class room, and all the students’ temperatures were taken. Students were asked about why their temperate was important, why it was approximately the same, and what happens if it gets too hot. This example was used as the basis for introducing the concept of climate change (klimawandel). Following activities took place:

• Class discussion about what understanding of climate change was
• Impacts of a warming climate were workshopped, including a focus on Austria’s glaciers
• Students watched some videos including parts of “An Inconvenient Truth” and live footage of the Paris Climate Summit, including a speech from US President Barack Obama
• Students interacted with online simulations, showing the concepts and impacts of climate change
• To practice English, students played “Hangman” together and completed word search and puzzle exercises

6. Carbon Footprint

Purpose:

To bring the global concepts of climate change and carbon pollution to a personal level and students to come up with ways in which they could reduce their own impact on climate change.

Practical Exercise:

An online ‘carbon footprint’ calculator was demonstrated to students, introducing them to the concept of a ‘carbon footprint’. Each student individually went through the process of calculating their own carbon footprint, based on their and their family’s activities throughout a single year (including food eaten, flights, house configuration etc). Students then discussed the simple ways in which our individual carbon footprint could be reduced.

7. Australian Mythology

Purpose:

To introduce students to an unfamiliar but rich culture in Australia - Aboriginal Australians - and to read a ‘story’ of Aboriginal mythology in line with the yearly theme, with all due respect, of fairy tales.

Practical Exercise:

Students simply read a story of where the didgeridoo came from, practicing reading English out loud in front of the class. Students asked questions about what certain words or phrases meant and wrote down unfamiliar words in their vocabulary cards. Maps were used to demonstrate the difference between Europe and Australia, in both simple and more complex ways, and discussions were held about why Australian Aboriginal culture was different to more familiar cultures in Europe.

8. Chernobyl

Purpose:

On the thirtieth anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, students were given the opportunity to learn more about something extremely significant that happened not long before they were born and which had a huge impact on humans and nature.

Practical Exercise:

Class discussion about what Chernobyl was, where it happened and what some of the impacts were. Students then watched a comprehensive documentary about the impacts of the Chernobyl nuclear meltdown on humans and nature living in the area. Discussion lead to Austria’s own un-used nuclear power station and whether this was a good or a bad idea.

Maßnahme im Detail

Bitte beschreiben Sie hier eine Maßnahme / ein Projekt näher. Diese Beschreibung wird als Inhaltsangabe Ihres Berichts verwendet.
Project Water

Purpose:

To highlight the importance of water to human beings and to nature, and to introduce students to the concept of water shortages and the amount of water it takes to make a particular everyday product.

Practical Exercise:

General class discussion on why water is important to humans, food production, nature and all the plants and animals with whom we share the planet.

Students were asked to think of simple items that they use or eat on a regular basis. The list of things was put on the blackboard and students were asked to order the things from least to most water use for the production of the particular item. Items included, cup of tea, coffee, pair of shoes, t-shirt, slice of bread, glass of milk, bag of chips, hamburger, 1kg of beef, an apple etc. Students had a fun time trying to persuade each other of the correct order and arguing over which they thought had more or less water use. Students learned that meat, particularly beef production, used an enormous amount of water compared to the other things on the list. Students were then asked how they could reduce their impact on water use.

Handlungsbereiche
Einsparen von Ressourcen, Natur erleben im Schulumfeld, Schulklima und Partizipation

Wie viele SchülerInnen haben an dieser Maßnahme / dem Projekt mitgewirkt?
10

Wie wurden geschlechterspezifische Lernzugänge berücksichtigt?
Die Berücksichtigung sind an unserer Schule pädagogisches Grundprinzip und daher fixer Bestandteil des Schulalltags.

Welche Außenkontakte / Kooperationen gab es im Rahmen dieser Maßnahme / dieses Projekts?
Der Ökologieunterricht wurde von einem australischen Fachexperten unterstützt und in englischer Arbeitssprache abgehalten.
Unser Experte hat u.a. australische NGOs bei der Weltklimakonferenz in Paris und Qatar vertreten und seine Erfahrungen aus diesem Bereich sind in den Unterricht eingeflossen.

Wie wurde die Maßnahme / das Projekt präsentiert? In welcher Form erfolgte die Öffentlichkeitsarbeit?
Portfoliopräsentation vor allen Schüler_innen und päd. Team; keine gesonderte ÖA

Wie wurde die Maßnahme / das Projekt reflektiert/evaluiert?
Evaluierung im pädagogischen Team im Rahmen der regelm. Teamsitzungen; Präsentation der Schwerpunktthemen im Rahmen der Elternabende sowie direkt mit den Schüler_innen im Rahmen der päd. Arbeit/Feedbackgespräche.

Was wurde durch diese Maßnahme im Bezug auf das Jahresziel erreicht?
Verstärkung des ökologischen Bewusstseins besonders in Bezug auf das Thema Ressourcenschonung
Bewusstsein, dass Umwelt uns ständig umgibt vertieft
Die Eigenverantwortung für tägliches Handeln im Zusammenhang mit natürlichen Ressourcen wurde gestärkt.

Woran haben wir den Erfolg erkannt?
Die Schüler_innen gehen bewusster mit der Ressource Wasser um. Motivierte Mitarbeit der Schüler_innen im Projekt und ihre Präsentationen.

Was hat sich durch die Maßnahme an der Schule verändert?
Bewussterer Umgang mit Wasser

Wo liegen unsere Stärken?
Praxisnaher Unterricht mit hohem Alltagsbezug und daher nachhaltige Steigerung der Befähigung der Schüler_innen bei nachhaltigem Handeln.

Netzwerke
Unsere Schule ist auch noch Mitglied von anderen Netzwerken

Keine Mitgliedschaften bei anderen Netzwerken

Zusatzfrage für Klimabündnis-Schulen
Klimabündnisschule: Ökologie, Geschichte & Politik, Deutsch, Geographie, Kunst, Ernährung und Haushalt

Weitere Netzwerke
Wiener Netzwerk gesunde Schule; Modellschule der Initiative Schulen der Zukunft